Henry Hwangbo

Henry Hwangbo

Henry is a director with PwC’s Advisory practice, focused on emerging technology. He specializes in IT strategy, enterprise architecture planning and execution, and solutions delivery, and has more than 16 years of IT management experience across multiple industries including financial services, telecom, energy, and insurance. He is co-founder and director of PwC’s Emerging Technology Lab, which utilizes agile techniques to deliver engaging prototypes which merge industry needs with leading technology trends such as cloud computing, social media, mobile, and analytics. Henry holds an MBA from the Kellogg School of Business and a BS in Computer Engineering from the University of Illinois in Urbana/Champaign.

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The coding craze isn’t a fad

What coding teaches besides just how to build software: problem solving, the elegance of simplicity and teamwork.

A beacon for personalized customer engagement

A case for using beacons in combination with other technologies to create a truly custom customer experience.

Blockchains: Bitcoin’s boundless building blocks

We explore block chains—the foundation of Bitcoin—and how this innovation might impact industries worldwide.

Exploring the possibilities of virtual reality across industries

Six industries that can benefit from virtual reality applications—will your business be prepared?

Why every company needs its own tech lab

The importance of a having a lab that where you can run experiments and perfect existing systems to improve the business.

Graph databases: Beyond recommendation engines

Graph databases allow businesses to draw powerful connections between many data points to make better use of big data.

The capabilities and limitations of video analytics

Video analytics promise to help retailers better understand customers. Here are three issues to keep in mind.

Sensors and analytics creating a competitive edge in retail

What retailers need to consider before implementing sensors and data analytics to gain a competitive edge.

Enterprise innovators: Thinking big, acting small

Four ways to encourage innovation in your enterprise to effectively compete in the digital age.

Seven secrets of great gamification design

These seven guiding principles can help you succeed in gamification design.

The future of collaboration: Large-scale visualization

Why large-scale visualization may be the key to success for improving business decision making with data analytics.

The high value of advanced data visualization

Compelling visualizations are necessary for big data to make an impact on enterprise decision making.

Smarter business intelligence through sensors

Sensors and embedded computing are quietly re-architecting companies’ operations and business intelligence capabilities.

Engaging employees for an innovation advantage

Bridging enterprise silos to bring employees into the process and encourage innovation.

Mining Customer Insights with Speech-to-Text Technology

From touch and gesture interfaces to advanced facial recognition, our computers are communicating with us on an increasingly human level. One technology that is showing particular promise is a computer’s ability to recognize human speech or Speech-to-Text (STT). Applications such as Apple’s Siri, Google Now, and Nuance’s Dragon have brought voice-activated commands to the masses while enterprise companies are employing the technology to discover new insights from previously untapped audio and video data sources. One of the greatest benefits of STT is the ability to bridge the gap between unstructured audio/video data and advanced analytics such as machine learning, natural language processing (NLP), and graph analysis. A company’s ability to understand their most vocal customers, whether within their call centers or on video sharing sites, can lead to a better view of customers and their experiences. Call center logs can reveal interesting patterns and trends in the quality of customer agent call handling and (when combined with other data) call center operational costs. These insights could then be used to retrain customer service agents, identify and stop a poorly conceived marketing campaign, or quickly understand the root cause for a spike in call center volume. For example, PwC’s Emerging Tech …

Enterprise architecture for emerging technology: build, buy, or open source

As companies transition to more flexible IT platforms, they are searching for guidance on how to determine whether they should build their own application, use packaged applications from an ERP vendor, adopt an open source platform, or leverage a SaaS solution. It’s not an easy decision to make. Whether custom-built or vendor-based, projects can fail. Before making the transition, you should carefully consider the following differences surrounding support, customization and deployment. All things being equal, the primary difference between open source and vendor products is the source of support. Open source support options are “do it yourself.” If you’re not equipped for DIY, you’ll need to reach out to a forum or community involved with that project. In contrast, vendor products provide you a number to call when you need help, which can be either good or bad depending on the responsiveness of your vendor. When an open source platform/product has reached critical mass, you will usually find companies that provide professional support (e.g Redhat, Hadoop and Oracle VirtualBox.) Open source enhancements are usually quicker if you have a vibrant community. If you choose the vendor route, you’ll have better luck if your company is large. Vendors tend to listen to …

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Contacts

Chris Curran

Principal and Chief Technologist, PwC US Tel: +1 (214) 754 5055 Email

Vicki Huff Eckert

Global New Business & Innovation Leader Tel: +1 (650) 387 4956 Email

Mark McCaffery

US Technology, Media and Telecommunications (TMT) Leader Tel: +1 (408) 817 4199 Email